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Links to: Empirical Work on Dogs Dogs in the Context of Culture Lexicography
External Links to Resources on Figures of Speech:
icon for Leon's ELF Planet Leon's EFL Planet: English Figures of Speech This is far from the most comprehensive discussion of figures of speech, however the webmaster makes use of references to dogs to explain metaphors for those learning English as a foreign language. The site has a great clip from An American Tail: Fievel Goes West which includes 10 different types of metaphor involving dogs.
image for the University of Kentucky Division of Classics A Glossary of Rhetorical Terms with Examples This glossary is put together by Ross Scaife who adapted it from the original which was by Ernest Ament of Wayne State University. The list emphasizes classical literature.
George Lakoff Conceptual Metaphor Home Page is a research tool for cognitive scientists and others interested in the study of conceptual metaphor systems. Ongoing work in the metaphor system of English and other languages is made available here using a hypertext format which allows the reader to trace links between metaphors and thus get a better idea of the structure of the system.
logo for Grant Williams Figures of Speech Figures of Speech from Grant Williams' Studies in Early Modern Literature at Nipissing University in Ontario. This is an extensive and thoughtful list.
logo for Wikipedia Figure of Speech An extensive list with links to specific articles on the various figures. As with much of Wikipedia, it is somewhat uneven which does not diminish its usefulness.
tv tropes TV Tropes This is a wiki catalog of the tricks of the trade for writing fiction. Tropes are devices and conventions that a writer can reasonably rely on as being present in the audience members' minds and expectations. On the whole, tropes are not clichés. The word clichéd means "stereotyped and trite". In other words, dull and uninteresting. We are not looking for dull and uninteresting entries. We are here to recognize tropes and play with them, not to make fun of them.
American Rhetoric American Rhetoric. Rhetorical Figures in Sound. Figure of explication occurring when a comparison made by speaking of one thing in terms of another; an implied comparison between two different things which share at least one attribute in common; an association between two unlike things (A vs. B) achieved by borrowing the language that refers to thing A and applying it to thing B.  (not to be confused with simile)
Critical Inquiry Critical Inquiry. Autumn 1978 (v. 5, no. 1) * Ted Cohen: "Metaphor and the Cuiltivation of Intimacy" * Paul de Man: "The Epistemology of Metaphor" * Donald Davidson: "What Metaphors Mean" * Wayne C. Booth: "Metaphor as Rhetoric: The Problem of Evaluation" * Karsten Harries: "Metaphor and Transcendence" * David Tracy: "Metaphor and Religion: The Test Case of Christian Texts" * Richard Shiff: "Art and Life: A Metaphoric Relationship" * Howard Gardner and Ellen Winner: "The Development of Metaphoric Competence: Implications for Humanistic Disciplines" * Paul Ricoeur: "The Metaphorical Process as Cognition, Imagination, and Feeling"
somniloquy Somniloquy: Introduction to Metaphor. The purpose of this short essay isn't to delve into the elaborate theoretical discussions surrounding metaphor, but to provide the beginner with some basic ways to construct metaphors of one kind or another. There are numerous ways to classify metaphor; my intent here is classify them grammatically, to talk about them in terms of language, because language is a great place for the beginner to fatten his or her bag of tricks.
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